Reporting Conversations

If someone sends you a message that makes you uncomfortable, you can:
If you think they're using a fake account or pretending to be you or someone else, you can report their Facebook account.
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Note: If you want to report a secret conversation, follow these separate instructions.
If you think a message you've received goes against our Community Standards, you can let us know.
To send feedback on or report a conversation in Messenger:
Desktop App:
  1. Open the conversation and click .
  2. Click Something's Wrong.
  3. Select a category to help us understand what's wrong.
  4. Click Send Feedback.
Desktop (messenger.com):
  1. Below Chats, click on the conversation you want to report or give feedback on.
  2. On the right, click Privacy and Support.
  3. Click Something's Wrong.
  4. Select a category to help us understand what's wrong.
  5. Click Send Feedback.
Keep in mind that not everything that may be upsetting violates our Community Standards. Community Standards violations include:
  • Bullying or harassment: content that appears to purposefully target a person with the intention of degrading or shaming them, or repeatedly contacting a person despite that person’s clear desire and action to prevent contact.
  • Impersonation: accounts that pretend to be you or someone else.
  • Direct threats: serious threats of harm to public and personal safety, credible threats of physical harm, specific threats of theft, vandalism or other financial harm.
  • Sexual violence and exploitation: content that threatens or promotes sexual violence or exploitation, including solicitation of sexual material, any sexual content involving minors, threats to share intimate images and offers of sexual services.
Facebook reviews up to 30 of the most recent messages sent in a conversation reported by an account in the European Union.
Learn more about Facebook safety tools and resources. If you ever feel like you or someone you know is in immediate danger, contact your local law enforcement. If someone is bothering you in Messenger, you can always ignore the conversation or block them. Learn more about how to ignore a conversation and how to block messages from someone.
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Accounts that pretend to be you or someone else aren't allowed in Messenger. To let us know if you see an account that's pretending to be you, someone you know or a public figure (like a celebrity or politician):
Desktop App:
  1. Open the conversation.
  2. Click at the top right > Something's Wrong.
  3. Select Pretending to Be Someone as your category.
  4. Select who they are pretending to be, and click Send Feedback.
Desktop (messenger.com):
  1. Open the conversation.
  2. In the person's account on the right, click Privacy and Support.
  3. Click Something's Wrong.
  4. Select Pretending to Be Someone as your category.
  5. Select who they are pretending to be, and click Send Feedback > Done.
To report impersonation on Facebook, please visit the Facebook Help Center.
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If you think a message you've received in a secret conversation goes against our Community Standards, you can report it. Learn more about what a secret conversation is.
When you report a secret conversation, recent messages from that conversation will be decrypted and sent securely from your device to our Help Team for review. We won't tell the person you're talking to that you reported it.
Community Standards violations can include bullying or harassment, threats and sexual violence or exploitation. Keep in mind that not everything that may be upsetting violates our Community Standards. If someone is bothering you in a secret conversation on Messenger, you can always block them on Messenger. You can also block them on Facebook.
Note: People in secret conversations can set messages to disappear. You can report messages for a short time after they've disappeared.
To report a secret conversation:
Learn more about Facebook safety tools and resources. If you ever feel like you or someone you know is in immediate danger, contact your local law enforcement.
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